The Best Edible Flowers for Your Next Dish

Lifestyle

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Source: Treehugger.com

Source: Treehugger.com

Growing your own food is a great way to live healthy and to assure you can survive if the human race is suddenly demolished in a zombie apocalypse.

When most people think of edible plants, they think of the herbs and vegetables that are commonly used in recipes. However, there is a whole world out there of edible flowers that are just as good in a salad as kale is. Edible flowers have many flavors and can be a great way to add a spot of color to your dish.

However, keep in mind it is only safe to eat flowers you have grown yourself that you know are edible and not treated with pesticides. Remember to only eat the petals and wash them thoroughly before eating. Flowers can look very similar to each other, so, unless you are 110 percent positive of a flowers identity, it’s better to skip it.

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Chive Blossoms

Source: Gorgegrown.com

Source: Gorgegrown.com

Chive blossoms can be used in a plethora of ways. Simply take the blossom off the stem and from there you can pull the flower apart for specks of color or garnish, or you can mix them with a spread. You can even fry them for a nice, crunchy snack. They will add a delicate onion-like flavor to your dish.

Nasturtiums

Source: Wikihow.com

Source: Wikihow.com

You’ll see this flower pop up in lots of flower dishes. They’re a bit spicy and have a peppery taste, but if you can handle it, these flowers make an excellent addition to any salad or a garnish on any plate of food.

Roses

Source: Wikipedia

Source: Wikipedia

Yes, roses taste as good as they look. In fact, they taste exactly like they look: very sweet! They also have subtle hints of fruit and spice. The flavor can vary depending on color, darker roses tend to have a more pronounced flavor.

Lavender

Source: Allure.com

Source: Allure.com

We all know lavender has a soothing scent and that it’s used in a multitude of beauty products, but it’s also edible. Like the rose, lavender also has a really sweet taste. You can use it to complement fish or poultry and also use it in spreads or sauces.

Tulbaghia Violacea (Society Garlic)

Source: Mgonlinestore.com

Source: Mgonlinestore.com

Society garlic gets its name from, you guessed it, smelling like garlic. However, it’s less likely to leave the garlic taste on your breath after eating it, which means it’s OK to eat in social settings. Use this flower to give salads or desserts an extra kick.

Courgette Flowers (Squash Blossoms)

Source: Bbcgoodfood.com/

Source: Bbcgoodfood.com

How good does that flower look? It’s actually a stuffed courgette flower, for which you can find the recipe here. They come from the same species that produce zucchini and other squashes. Courgette flowers have a delicate, sweet taste and are good when stuffed with cheese or risotto. You can also deep fry them for a crunch.

Daylily

Source: Chicagonow.com

Source: Chicagonow.com

Daylilies are a super popular flower to use in cooking because of their abundance in nature and vegetable-like taste. You can batter and fry them or eat them raw. Just make sure that they are definitely daylilies, as other types of lilies can be toxic.

Violas and Pansies

Source: Wikipedia

Source: Wikipedia

Violas are commonly used to garnish cupcakes and cakes. They have a light perfume-y taste and make great edible decorations or good salad toppers.

Elderflower

Source: Wishgardenherbs.com

Source: Wishgardenherbs.com

Elderflowers are commonly used in drinks but you can also use them to make jams or syrups. One woman says she uses them when “cooking fruit for tarts and desserts.” There is also the ever popular elderflower cordial, which is a common summer drink.

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